In Distress with IBS

If you are a sufferer and in distress about IBS you need to listen to your body, and particularly what it is trying to flag up to you about your stress which is one of the leading factors that can trigger IBS symptoms.
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In Distress with IBS

What is the root cause of your stress?

If you are a sufferer and in distress with IBS you need to listen to your body, and particularly what it is trying to flag up to you about your stress which is one of the leading factors that can trigger IBS symptoms.

Stress-related IBS, also known as irritable bowel syndrome, is a condition that affects the large intestine, causing abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and diarrhoea. It is a chronic condition that can cause significant discomfort and affect quality of life.

Understanding the link between stress and IBS

Stress is a natural response of the body to situations that pose a threat. When the body perceives a threat, the brain activates the HPA (hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal) axis, triggering the release of cortisol, adrenaline, and other stress hormones. These hormones can affect the digestive system, causing symptoms such as cramps, diarrhoea, constipation, and bloating.

In people with IBS, stress can exacerbate symptoms or even trigger an episode. When stress is prolonged, it can also cause changes in the gut microbiome, leading to an imbalance of beneficial and harmful bacteria. This imbalance can cause inflammation, which can further aggravate IBS symptoms.

Help for stress-related IBS

Stress management

As a start point for stress management, we always recommend an Optimal Sound Therapy Assessment that helps you to swiftly reach harmony and emotional balance, through listening daily to bespoke Sound Files, accessed via an app.

Click here for details. https://optimal-healthgroup.com/full-assessments/#sound

This can also be complemented by stress management techniques such as cognitive-behavioural therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and hypnotherapy to help develop coping strategies, manage the stress and anxiety which can trigger symptoms, and overall to improve your quality of life.

Mind-body techniques

Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, and deep breathing exercises help reduce stress and anxiety, which can trigger IBS symptoms. These techniques can help calm the mind and reduce the production of stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. They can also improve sleep quality, which is essential for overall health and well-being.

You may already have a rhythm around this. If you don’t and would like some help the best starting point is an Optimal Breathwork Consultation with Dr. Priti where you learn to self-regulate your health with Therapeutic breathing. Ask us for information.

Exercise

Exercise can help reduce stress and improve overall health, which can alleviate IBS symptoms. It can improve digestion, reduce inflammation, and promote the production of endorphins, which are natural painkillers. It is best to choose low-impact exercises such as walking, yoga, or swimming, to avoid exacerbating symptoms.

Getting to Your Root Cause

It is great to have a range of modalities to help balance your stress but even better is an understanding of your root cause. We recommend that you start with an Initial Health Consultation.

How Optimal Health Can Help

If you are struggling with your gut health and would like some support, we recommend starting with an Initial Health Consultation for new patients. We connect online, listen clearly to your health concerns and priorities, ensure our philosophy meets your needs, and recommend the starting point for an Optimal Health Treatment Pathway ©

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